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"Psychologists who have studied children's growth from birth to University age maintain that this can be divided into various and distinct periods." (The Absorbent Mind, p. 17)

"Development is a series of rebirths." (The Absorbent Mind, p. 17)

"During this period the personality undergoes great changes. We have only to compare the newborn babe with the six year old to see this." (The Absorbent Mind, p. 18)

"The next period goes from six to twelve. It is a period of growth unaccompanied by other change. The child is calm and happy. Mentally, he is in a state of health, strength and assured stability." (The Absorbent Mind, p. 18)

"The third period goes from twelve to eighteen, and it is a period of so much change as to remind one of the first. It can again be divided into two subphases: one from twelve to fifteen, and the other from fifteen to eighteen. There are physical changes also during this period, the body reaching its full maturity." (The Absorbent Mind, p. 18)

"I have found that in his development, the child passes through certain phases, each of which has its own particular needs. The characteristics of each are so different that the passages from one phase to the other has been described by certain psychologists as 'rebirths'." (Four Planes of Education, p. 1)

"The child's development follows a path of successive stages of independence, and our knowledge of this must guide us in our behaviour towards him. We have to help the child to act, will and think for himself. This is the art of serving the spirit, an art which can be practised to perfection only when working among children." (The Absorbent Mind, p. 257)

"My vision of the future is no longer of people taking exams and proceeding from secondary school to University but of passing from one stage of independence to a higher, by means of their own activity and effort of will." (From Childhood to Adolescence, opening)

"Successive levels of education must correspond to the successive personalities of the child. Our methods are oriented not to any pre-established principles but rather to the inherent characteristics of the different ages. It follows that these characteristics themselves include several levels." (From Childhood to Adolescence, p. 1)

"The first phase of the child's development goes from birth to, let us say, six years of age. At this stage the child is partly at home, partly in school. The plane of education should take both the situations into consideration." (Four Planes of Education, p. 2)

"Education, therefore, of little ones is important, especially from  three to six years of age, because this is the embryonic period for the formation of character and of society, (just as the period from birth to three is that for forming the mind, and the prenatal period that for forming the body." (The Absorbent Mind, p. 221/2)

"Education should not limit itself to seeking new methods for a mostly arid transmission of knowledge: its aim must be to give the necessary aid to human development. This world, marvellous in its power, needs a "new man." It is therefore the life of man and his values that must be considered. If "the formation of man" becomes the basis of education, then the coordination of all schools from infancy to maturity, from nursery to university, arises as a first necessity: for man is a unity, an individuality that passes through interdependent phases of development. Each preceding phase prepares the one that follows, forms its base, nurtures the energies that urge towards the succeeding period of life." (From Childhood to Adolescence, p. 84)